Hot Tub for your Health!

If people knew you were taking a dip in your personal hot tub every night, they may call you a little… “high-maintenance”? What if they knew that it was much more than your nightly leisure routine? Few people know the extent of benefits that come from frequent lounges in a warm soothing oasis. History, doctors, researchers, and first-person testimonials have shared convincing evidence about how incorporating the use of hot tubs into your healthcare regiment can work wonders.

hot water rehabPeople suffering from aches and pains usually treat themselves with expensive massages and warm Epsom salt baths. Not only do these treatments feel good, but the warm water helps blood vessels to open up, which allows blood pressure to decrease, increasing blood flow and improving overall circulation. Improved blood circulation does not only minimize aches and pains, but also creates a better environment for the body to digest food and boosts the immune system. You can tell your friends it is part of your “diet”. Before you know it, they will be inviting themselves over.

Massages accelerate the body’s natural healing process. They promote relaxation, release accumulated stress, and gently stretch connective tissues. With special massage jet features, a hot tub can save you thousands of dollars a year. Although a massage from your hot tub may not be as direct and intense as a physical massage, the access you have to daily massages reduces the necessity of expensive intense massages. Tense muscles and stressed nerves do not come once a month, they regularly build day to day. Relieve these incremental stresses with incremental massages and treatment from a hot tub.

Joints are another area affected by daily stresses. Your joints suffer nagging aches and pains that can be put at ease with practicing regular relaxation. The buoyancy in hot tubs reduces body weight by 90%, allowing your body to relax. Not only is your body able to release, but also your mind. Why do you think the simple imagery of a lounging woman floating in the ocean’s horizon resembles serenity; the natural buoyancy is soothing. This feeling of weightlessness calms every part of you.

All of this relaxing may make you a bit… sleepy? Great! Sleep is the number one factor in maintaining your health- from managing diabetes to improving performance and memory. Hot tubs can relieve stress and improve sleep. As we know, sitting in a hot tub increases body temperatures- great for cold nights and even sunny days. The drop in body temperature after a dip in the hot tub signals your body that it is time to sleep. More sleep, more health. Studies suggest that spending 15 minutes in a hot tub 90 minutes before bedtime can lead to an improved night’s sleep. Try it!

Stress doesn’t only place stress on your mental, but it also causes stress on your physical causing your heart to work harder, more rapid and shallow breathing, and slowing of digestion. Bodies suffer as an entirety. Practice yoga? Pilates? Meditation? Great! Adding the use of a hot tub will add similar benefits by creating a peaceful place to break away from the day. A soothing and relaxing soak in a hot tub can help counteract stress and its effects on the human body. It is the perfect antidote to a hectic and stressful lifestyle. Heat, buoyancy, and massage are key factors that together create a therapeutic and stress-relieving environment.

Arthritis sufferers benefit from the “restoration and preservation of strength and flexibility … from the lessened stress on joints.” For Type II Diabetics, hot tubs have been known to help people lose weight and manage their blood sugar levels. Hot tubs are also a good alternative for those unable to exercise. While hot tubs have been proven to improve conditions of Type II Diabetes and a variety of Arthritis sufferers, always consult with your doctor before using hot tubs in your regular routine (diabetics commonly have nerve damage in their feet, which would make them susceptible to burns). (Arthritis Foundation)

manning in hot tubAnother frequent visitor of hot tubs are athletes. Most for injury preventative reasons, but many for the management of chronic pain and fatigue reduction from overuse of muscles. Other medical conditions like fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome share these symptoms and can also benefit from hot tubs. Light stretching while in the water provides additional relief from these symptoms. The use of hot tubs has been proven to reduce the use of analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs. Both elite athletes and occasional recreational athletes can greatly benefit from a hot tub. I know that as a Division I NCAA track and field athlete, I owe a lot of my performances to proper heating and massage therapy- often from our heated whirlpools.

Some people may refute the power of a hot tub, but it is hard to ignore the historical evidence that heated water, massage, and buoyancy have magical powers (scientific really). The ancient cultures of the Romans, Egyptians, Indians, Greeks, Germans, and Japanese practiced the same treatments for optimal health and serenity. Hydrotherapy treatments that combine elements of heated water, massage, and decreased pressure on sore joints by decreasing body weight through buoyancy have been in practice for centuries.

Become a part of history and try it out for yourself.